Category Archives: Muslim Holidays

All dates, history and customs of Muslim holidays in the Philippines, and how they can affect your payroll and HR

Holiday Pay Calculations: Amon Jadid, November 5th

Islamic New Year Graphic

Amon Jadid is a ‘common local holiday’ for Muslim provinces

Amon Jadid (Amun Jadid) is only a common local holiday. These are not nation-wide holidays and are not included on the Philippines list of national holidays 2013.

Common local holiday quick facts:

  1. Presidential Decree No. 1083 (Code of Muslim Personal Laws of the Philippines) consideres Amon Jadid to be a ‘common local holiday’ for all employees (Muslim and Christian)
  2. Common local holidays are observed in Muslim provinces and cities
  3. Inside a Muslim province or city, both Muslims and Christians are entitled to a holiday
  4. Outside a Muslim province or city, only Muslims are entitled to a holiday
  5. Amon Jadid is classed as a special (non-working) holiday

For a more in depth look at the rules and regulations around Muslim holidays please read our posts Muslim Provinces and Cities: Rules For Payroll And HR and Muslim Holidays: Regular Or Special Holidays For Payroll?

Payroll Calculations for Amon Jadid in the Philippines

The payroll recommendations below are from a document issued by the Department of Labor and Employment in the Philippines, and are correct as of January 10th, 2013.

 

  •  If an employee does not report to work on Amon Jadid the “no work, no pay” principle shall apply, unless there is a favorable company policy, practice, or collective bargaining agreement (CBA) granting payment on a special day

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  • If an employee reported to work on Amon Jadid, they entitled to be paid an additional 30% of their daily rate, for the first eight hours of work

Payroll Calculation: [(Daily rate x 130%) + COLA)

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  •  If an employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work) on Amon Jadid, they shall be paid an additional 30 percent of their hourly rate on said day

Payroll Calculation: [(Hourly rate of the basic daily wage x 130%) x 130%] x number of hours worked

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  • If an employee worked on Amon Jadid and that day also falls on their rest day, they are entitled to be paid an additional 50% of their daily rate, for the first eight hours of work

Payroll Calculation: [(Daily rate x 150%) + COLA]

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  • If an employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work) on Amon Jadid and that day also falls on their rest day, they shall be paid an additional 30 percent of their hourly rate on said day

Payroll Calculation: [(Hourly rate of the basic daily wage x 150%) x 130%] x number of hours worked

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Why Amon Jadid might be important for your employees

There is a large Muslim population in the Philippines and even a whole region that is not under the jurisdiction of the Philippines government.  So if think that your outsourced employees may live in a Muslim province or city we would recommend reading our post Muslim Provinces and Cities: Rules For Payroll And HR for more information on the Islamic regions in the Philippines.

It is always a nice experience for an employee to have a manager who is informed and educated on their faith.

Common Local Holiday: Amon Jadid Philippines, November 5th

Graphic showing islamic year 1434

2013 is the Islamic year 1434. Islamic year 1435 will start on Amun Jadid, November 5th

What is Amon Jadid?

Amon Jadid (sometimes seen as Amun Jadid) is the first day of the Islamic Calendar. In western tradition it would be likened to New Years Day.

The Islamic calendar has 12 months, like the Gregorian calendar (also known as the Western or Christian calendar), but because it is a lunar calendar there are only 354 days in a year.  Amum Jadid is the first day of the first month, Muharram – one of four months in the Islamic calendar in which it is forbidden for Muslims to fight.

4 reasons why Amun Jadid is important for your HR or payroll

Muslim holidays can easily trip up your payroll, especially if your employees work remotely and they live in a Muslim province or city. The following points are referred to from Presidential Decree No. 1083 (Code of Muslim Personal Laws of the Philippines) and the Department of Employment and Labor handbook.

    1. Eid ul-Fitr and Eid ul-Adha are the only two Muslim observances to be recognized as regular holidays by the Philippines government
    2. All other Muslim observances, like Amun Jadid, are considered to be ‘common local holidays’ and are traditionally observed in Muslim provinces and cities only. Read our post Muslim Provinces and Cities: Rules For Payroll And HR for a more in depth explanation
    3. In a Muslim province or city, all Muslims and Christians are entitled to a common local holiday to observe Amun Jadid
    4. Outside a Muslim province and city, all Muslims (but not Christians) are entitled to a holiday to observe Amun Jadid

Related posts: Muslim Holiday: EId-al-Adha, Date TBA and Muslim Holiday: Eid ul-Fitr, August 9th

Why Amun Jadid could be important to your employees

A number of important events in Islamic history have occurred in the month of Muharram. These include the Battle of Karbala on Amun Jadid, the first day of the month; the restriction of Husayn ibn Ali’s access to water on the seventh day; and the death of Husayn ibn Ali and the defeat of his army on the 10th day of the month. Amun Jadid and Muharram are a time of mourning and peace.

Muslims traditionally start their holiday celebrations at sun down of the previous day. If you have Muslim employees who work night shifts, be prepared for them to request the night off of the day before, and the day off, Amun Jadid.

What should you pay your employees on Amun Jadid?

To help remove some of the confusion around this topic, we have prepared a set of payroll calculations specifically for Amun Jadid including:

  • What to pay employees who report to work
  • What to pay employees who do not report to work
  • What to pay employees who work over time on Amun Jadid

To get the calculations, read our blog post Holiday Pay Calculations: Amun Jadid, November 5th

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Payroll Calculations: Eid al-Adha Islamic Holiday, October 15th

Muslims take the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca

Will any of your employees be taking part in the Hajj pilgrimage this year?

Eid al-Adha is a national holiday for your Philippines Employees

The Eid al-Adha Islamic holiday is important to your employees because even if your employees are not Muslim they are entitled to observe Ed al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr. Both of these Muslim holidays are national holidays for all employees in the Philippines.

Only Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr are national Muslim holidays. Other Islamic observances and holidays are ‘common local holidays’ and are traditionally only observed in Muslim provinces or cities.

For a full list of Muslim provinces and cities, as well as Muslim holiday pay regulations from the Department of Labor and Employment handbook, see our post: Muslim Provinces and Cities: Rules For Payroll And HR

Payroll Calculations for Eid al-Adha

For the purpose of payroll, the Eid al-Adha Islamic holiday is considered to be a regular holiday for the Philippines. If an employee reports to work on Eid al-Adha they are entitled to 200% of their daily rate. The calculations for Eid al-Adha payroll would be as follows:

Related Post: Muslim Holidays: Regular Or Special Holidays For Payroll

  • If an employee did not work on Eid al-Adha they are entitled to be paid 100% of their salary for that day 

Payroll Calculation: (Daily rate + COLA) x 100%. As in most countries, some employees in the Philippines can expect to receive a COLA (Cost of Living Allowance)

  • If an employee did work on Eid al-Adha they are entitled to be paid 200% of their regular salary for that day for the first eight hours

Payroll Calculation(Daily rate + COLA) x 200%

  • If an employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work) on Eid al-Adha, they are entitled be paid an additional 30% of their hourly rate on said day

Payroll Calculation: [(Hourly rate of the basic daily wage x 200%) x 130% ] x number of excess hours worked

  • If an employee worked on Eid al-Adha and it also fell on their rest day, they are entitled to be paid an additional 30% of their daily rate of 200%.

Payroll Calculation(Daily rate + COLA) x 200%] + (30% [Daily rate x 200%)]

  • If an employee works in excess of eight hours (overtime work) on Eid al-Adha and it also fells on their rest day, they are entitled to paid an additional 30% of their hourly rate on said day

Payroll Calculation: {[(Hourly rate of the basic daily wage x 200%) x 130%] x 130%} x number of hours worked

Are you taking part in the pilgrimage? Need someone to look after payroll and HR while you’re away?

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Muslim Holidays In The Philippines: EId-al-Adha, October 15th

Eid celebrations

Everyone celebrates Eid al-Adha, even small children. Photo, Danny Pata

What is Eid ul-Adha?

Eid al-Adha (some times seen as Id al-Adha or Eid ul-Adha) is one of a four-day Islamic festival starting on the 10th day of the month of Dhu al-Hijja. The festival commemorates the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to follow Allah’s command and sacrifice his son, Ishmael. But at the last minute Allah intervened and gave Abraham a ram to sacrifice instead. Eid al-Adha, the ‘Festival of the Sacrifice’, begins on the tenth day and ends on the thirteenth day of Dhu al-Hijja.

Thousands of Muslims gather for the Hajj

The Hajj pilgrimage during Dhu al-Hijjah. Photo, dailyfresher.com

Dhu al-Hijja is a very scared month in Islam as it marks the end of the year. It is also translated to mean ’Possessor of the Pilgrimage’ as it is the month in which the Hajj pilgrimage takes place.

When is Eid ul-Adha?

The unofficial date is October 15th, 2013. This is the date in the Gregorian calendar that lines up with the Islamic lunar calendar. However, the date of Eid al-Adha will be announced when the National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) informs the Office of the President of the offical date. This is typically done about one month before.

We will up-date this post when the date is announced.

Why Eid al-Adha could be important to your employees

Eid al-Adha and Eid ul-Fitr are two Muslim holidays in the Philippines that are national holidays for all employees.

According to the Muslim Affairs Office, Filippino Muslims account for around 5% of the total population of the Philippines. That’s almost 4 million people who could potentially ltake Eid al-Adha as a holiday, and therefore must be paid holiday pay according Proclamation No. 488, stating Eid al-Adha as a regular holiday across the Philippines.

How Eid al-Adha could affect your HR?

Planning employee coverage

Traditionally Islamic holidays begins at sun set of the previous day, so some Muslims may start their holiday customs on the evening preceding the official Eid al-Adha holiday. If you have staff who work night shifts, be prepared for them to possibly want the night off on the evening before Eid ul-Adha.

It is during the month of Dhu al-Hijjah that pilgrims from all around the world congregate at Mecca to visit the Kaaba, and some of your employees may wish to make this pilgrimage too. Plan ahead for any potential holiday requests around this time.

Planning payroll

There are a lot of variables when it come to holiday pay for Muslim holidays, so make sure you’re staying within the law, by reading our blog post: Holiday Pay Calculations for Eid ul-Adha.

Making your employees happy

Planning adequate staffing around religious holidays can prevent any unproductive tension between yourself and staff members. Work with your employees to plan the schedule covering religious holidays, you’ll find that there will naturally be some people who are happy to work and that will make it easier to accommodate those who don’t want to work.

Muslim Provinces in the Philippines: Rules For Payroll, HR and Holidays

Map of Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao

Map showing the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, the traditional homeland of Muslim Filipinos since the 15th century. Image from Wikipedia

Islamic holidays and Muslim provinces in the Philippines

Muslim holidays are ‘common local holidays’ that are traditionally observed in Muslim provinces and cities. However, there are some exceptions below that are taken from the Department of Labor and Employment handbook:

In a Muslim province or city, both Muslims and Christians are entitled to enjoy a holiday:

“Considering that all private corporations, offices, agencies, and entities or establishments operating within the designated Muslim provinces and cities are required to observe Muslim holidays, both Muslims and Christians working within the Muslim areas may not report for work on the days designated by law as Muslim holidays” - Presidential Proclamation No. 1198 (26 October 1973), referenced from the Department of Labor and Employment, Philippines

Outside of a Muslim province or city, Muslims are entitled to a holiday:

“All Muslim employees working outside of the Muslim provinces and cities shall be excused from work during the observance of the Muslim holidays as recognized by law without diminution or loss of wages during the said period” - Presidential Proclamation No. 1198 (26 October 1973), referenced from the Department of Labor and Employment, Philippines

A list of muslim provinces in the Philippiness

Upon proclamation by the President of the Philippines, Muslim holidays may be officially observed in all Muslim provinces and cities. The largest population of Filipino Muslims is located in The Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (abbreviated ARMM) located in the Mindanao island group of the Philippines. It is composed of predominantly Muslim provinces and it is the only region of the Philippines that has its own government.

  • Basilan
  • Lanao del Norte
  • Lanao del Sur
  • Maguindanao
  • North Cotabato
  • Sultan Kudarat
  • Sulu
  • Tawi-Tawi
  • Zamboanga del Norte and Zamboanga del Sur and in the cities of Cotabato, Iligan, Marawi, Pagadian, and Zamboanga
  • And in such other Muslim provinces and cities as may be created by law

Now you’ve determined whether your employees are entitled to a holiday, you should read our post on Muslim Holidays: Regular Or Special Holidays For Payroll?

 

Muslim National Holidays: Eid ul-Fitr, August 9th

Eid ul Fitr street celebrations

This market comes alive on the eve of Eid ul-Fitr as Muslims prepare to break their Ramadan fasting. Photo Siddharth Subramanian

What is the Muslim holiday Eid ul-Fitr?

Eid ul-Fitr (sometimes seen as Eid al-Fitr, Eid-al-Fitr, Id-Ul-Fitr or just, Eid) is the first day of the Islamic month of Shawwal. It marks the end of Ramadan, which is a month of fasting and prayer. Many Muslims will hold big family gatherings, dinners and feasts to celebrate the end of Ramadan and the start of Eid ul-Fitr.

Why Eid ul-Fitr could be important to your employees

Even if your employees are not Muslim they are entitled to observe Ed al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr, the two Muslim national holidays for the Philippines.

According to the Muslim Affairs Office, Filippino Muslims account for around 5% of the total population of the Philippines. That’s almost 4 million people who would potentially like to take August 9th 2013 as a holiday, as well as 4 million people who may or may not be entitled to holiday pay.

How Eid ul-Fitr could affect your scheduling

Planning employee coverage

In keeping with Islamic tradition, some of your employees may start celebrating their Muslim national holidays at sun set of the previous day. For Eid ul-Fitr this would be on the evening of August 8th. If you have staff who work night shifts, be prepared for them to potentially ask for the night off on the evening before Eid ul-Fitr.

Planning payroll

There are a lot of variables when it come to holiday pay for Muslim holidays, so make sure you’re staying within the law, by reading our blog post: Holiday Pay Calculations for Eid ul-Fitr

Making your employees happy

Planning adequate staffing around muslim national holidays can prevent any unproductive tension between yourself and staff members. Work with your employees to plan the schedule covering religious holidays, you’ll find that there will naturally be some people who are happy to work and that will make it easier to accommodate those who don’t want to work.

Related post: Muslim Holidays: Regular Or Special Holidays For Payroll?

Muslim Holiday Dates: Regular Or Special Holidays For Payroll?

Muslim Holiday Celebrations

You can see this photo and more of Muslim holiday celebrations on AllVoices

There are two Muslim holiday dates in the national holiday calendar

  1. Eid al-Fitr, August 9th
  2. Eid al-Adha, date TBA

Proclamations added these dates into the official calendar to help engage non-Muslims in Islamic celebrations. Muslims and non-muslims can enjoy a holiday on these dates. 

 According to the  Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines’:

“The dates of the Muslim holidays differ every year, so it would be consistent with the Muslim calendar. The Office of the President usually issues the proclamation a month before the Muslim holiday. The proclamations are national holidays, so in the event that one is called for work during that day, they are entitled for holiday pay.” – The Official Gazette

What does this mean for your holiday payroll?

For payroll purposes the Department of Labor and Employment in the Philippines splits holidays into two categories. These two national Muslim holidays follow the holiday pay guidelines for regular holidays. Below are links to payroll calculations for both holidays to will walk you through the process quickly and easily.

Holiday Pay Calculations: Eid ul-Fitr, August 9th

Payroll Calculations: Eid al-Adha, Date TBA

 

Other Islamic holidays are ‘common local holidays’ not national holidays

All other events or holidays in the Islamic calendar are considered to be common local holidays, and they are traditionally observed in Muslim provinces and cities only, according to Presidential Decree No. 1083 (Code of Muslim Personal Laws of the Philippines).

For other Islamic holidays, here are the recommendations from the Department of Labor and Employment handbook:

In a Muslim province or city, both Muslims and Christians are entitled to enjoy a holiday:

“Considering that all private corporations, offices, agencies, and entities or establishments operating within the designated Muslim provinces and cities are required to observe Muslim holidays, both Muslims and Christians working within the Muslim areas may not report for work on the days designated by law as Muslim holidays” - Presidential Proclamation No. 1198 (26 October 1973), referenced from the Department of Labor and Employment, Philippines

Outside of a Muslim province or city, Muslims are entitled to a holiday:

“All Muslim employees working outside of the Muslim provinces and cities shall be excused from work during the observance of the Muslim holidays as recognized by law without diminution or loss of wages during the said period” - Presidential Proclamation No. 1198 (26 October 1973), referenced from the Department of Labor and Employment, Philippines

Struggling to keep track of all the holidays?

PayrollHero is a consumer-friendly time, attendance, scheduling and payroll app that is based in the cloud built for web and mobile – it will look after all of your payroll and HR needs.

Visit the PayrollHero website, now, to see how PayrollHero can automatically keep you on track with all of the Philippine holidays.