Tag Archives: Common Local Holidays

Holiday Pay Calculations: Amon Jadid, November 5th

Islamic New Year Graphic

Amon Jadid is a ‘common local holiday’ for Muslim provinces

Amon Jadid (Amun Jadid) is only a common local holiday. These are not nation-wide holidays and are not included on the Philippines list of national holidays 2013.

Common local holiday quick facts:

  1. Presidential Decree No. 1083 (Code of Muslim Personal Laws of the Philippines) consideres Amon Jadid to be a ‘common local holiday’ for all employees (Muslim and Christian)
  2. Common local holidays are observed in Muslim provinces and cities
  3. Inside a Muslim province or city, both Muslims and Christians are entitled to a holiday
  4. Outside a Muslim province or city, only Muslims are entitled to a holiday
  5. Amon Jadid is classed as a special (non-working) holiday

For a more in depth look at the rules and regulations around Muslim holidays please read our posts Muslim Provinces and Cities: Rules For Payroll And HR and Muslim Holidays: Regular Or Special Holidays For Payroll?

Payroll Calculations for Amon Jadid in the Philippines

The payroll recommendations below are from a document issued by the Department of Labor and Employment in the Philippines, and are correct as of January 10th, 2013.

 

  •  If an employee does not report to work on Amon Jadid the “no work, no pay” principle shall apply, unless there is a favorable company policy, practice, or collective bargaining agreement (CBA) granting payment on a special day

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  • If an employee reported to work on Amon Jadid, they entitled to be paid an additional 30% of their daily rate, for the first eight hours of work

Payroll Calculation: [(Daily rate x 130%) + COLA)

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  •  If an employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work) on Amon Jadid, they shall be paid an additional 30 percent of their hourly rate on said day

Payroll Calculation: [(Hourly rate of the basic daily wage x 130%) x 130%] x number of hours worked

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  • If an employee worked on Amon Jadid and that day also falls on their rest day, they are entitled to be paid an additional 50% of their daily rate, for the first eight hours of work

Payroll Calculation: [(Daily rate x 150%) + COLA]

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  • If an employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work) on Amon Jadid and that day also falls on their rest day, they shall be paid an additional 30 percent of their hourly rate on said day

Payroll Calculation: [(Hourly rate of the basic daily wage x 150%) x 130%] x number of hours worked

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Why Amon Jadid might be important for your employees

There is a large Muslim population in the Philippines and even a whole region that is not under the jurisdiction of the Philippines government.  So if think that your outsourced employees may live in a Muslim province or city we would recommend reading our post Muslim Provinces and Cities: Rules For Payroll And HR for more information on the Islamic regions in the Philippines.

It is always a nice experience for an employee to have a manager who is informed and educated on their faith.

Common Local Holiday: Amon Jadid Philippines, November 5th

Graphic showing islamic year 1434

2013 is the Islamic year 1434. Islamic year 1435 will start on Amun Jadid, November 5th

What is Amon Jadid?

Amon Jadid (sometimes seen as Amun Jadid) is the first day of the Islamic Calendar. In western tradition it would be likened to New Years Day.

The Islamic calendar has 12 months, like the Gregorian calendar (also known as the Western or Christian calendar), but because it is a lunar calendar there are only 354 days in a year.  Amum Jadid is the first day of the first month, Muharram – one of four months in the Islamic calendar in which it is forbidden for Muslims to fight.

4 reasons why Amun Jadid is important for your HR or payroll

Muslim holidays can easily trip up your payroll, especially if your employees work remotely and they live in a Muslim province or city. The following points are referred to from Presidential Decree No. 1083 (Code of Muslim Personal Laws of the Philippines) and the Department of Employment and Labor handbook.

    1. Eid ul-Fitr and Eid ul-Adha are the only two Muslim observances to be recognized as regular holidays by the Philippines government
    2. All other Muslim observances, like Amun Jadid, are considered to be ‘common local holidays’ and are traditionally observed in Muslim provinces and cities only. Read our post Muslim Provinces and Cities: Rules For Payroll And HR for a more in depth explanation
    3. In a Muslim province or city, all Muslims and Christians are entitled to a common local holiday to observe Amun Jadid
    4. Outside a Muslim province and city, all Muslims (but not Christians) are entitled to a holiday to observe Amun Jadid

Related posts: Muslim Holiday: EId-al-Adha, Date TBA and Muslim Holiday: Eid ul-Fitr, August 9th

Why Amun Jadid could be important to your employees

A number of important events in Islamic history have occurred in the month of Muharram. These include the Battle of Karbala on Amun Jadid, the first day of the month; the restriction of Husayn ibn Ali’s access to water on the seventh day; and the death of Husayn ibn Ali and the defeat of his army on the 10th day of the month. Amun Jadid and Muharram are a time of mourning and peace.

Muslims traditionally start their holiday celebrations at sun down of the previous day. If you have Muslim employees who work night shifts, be prepared for them to request the night off of the day before, and the day off, Amun Jadid.

What should you pay your employees on Amun Jadid?

To help remove some of the confusion around this topic, we have prepared a set of payroll calculations specifically for Amun Jadid including:

  • What to pay employees who report to work
  • What to pay employees who do not report to work
  • What to pay employees who work over time on Amun Jadid

To get the calculations, read our blog post Holiday Pay Calculations: Amun Jadid, November 5th

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